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This is a guest post from Switchup, the comprehensive coding bootcamp resource. 

In the past 5 years, coding bootcamps and immersive courses have gone from an unconventional education option to a thriving industry. With the allure of high-paying tech jobs and the recent announcement that federal student loans now cover some coding bootcamps, it’s no wonder enrollment is soaring.

But are programming bootcamps worth the investment of time and money, and will you really graduate with the skills needed to land that web dev job? Many bootcamps claim you can, but with little industry regulation and in light of recent scandals, it can be hard to know if your investment will pay off.  

SwitchUp, a resource for prospective bootcamp students and alumni, started to answer that question and shed more transparency on this new industry.

Over the past year, we have surveyed alumni and gathered information about coding bootcamp students and their experiences. After hearing from more than 1,000 students and alums, we crunched the numbers and published the results.

  1. 63% of graduates reported an increase in salary. Those who reported an increase saw their salary jump by an average of $22,700.

Bootcamp grads continue to report a salary increase overall, and this number is up from 59% last year. Grads are also seeing a bigger salary bump. Respondents in 2015 who saw a salary increase reported an average increase of $18,101 within six months. This year, respondents saw an average increase of $22,700 after six months.

  1. Women are more prevalent in coding bootcamps than in computer science programs.

Coding Bootcamps have been praised for increasing diversity in tech, and this is definitely true when it comes to female programmers. In 2016, our data found that 43% of coding bootcamp grads were women, up from 41% in 2015. Conversely, just 12% of computer science grads are women.

Bootcamps have successfully proven that people from every background can make a career change into tech. It remains to be seen if computer science programs will make the same diversity gains in the future.

  1. Bootcamp market growth and evolution.

Have you noticed coding bootcamps popping up everywhere? The coding bootcamp market is booming, and we don’t see it slowing down anytime soon. Our survey looks at how the coding bootcamp market has grown (and continues to grow!) since 2013.  

Be sure to read the full survey outcomes here.

So are coding bootcamps worth it? It’s a complicated question, but if you are looking to get a job in the technology industry, our research says “yes!” Technology is an amazing industry to be in, and it can be very rewarding. But, before you take the leap into a full-on intensive course, you’ll need to do your research to make sure coding is right for you. We suggest you focus on a few things to get started:

Know Your Career Goals

Make sure you have a clear understanding of your own career goals and where you see yourself in the industry. Coding bootcamps now focus on a broad range of topics and languages, and the perfect bootcamp curriculum will depend on your individual needs. Spend some time researching the different careers that students often pursue after attending a bootcamp, and decide which career paths are most appealing to you. Once you understand your career path, you’ll be able to choose the right course.

Do Your Homework

Remember, before attending a bootcamp, research everything you can about the curriculum, teachers, and job support. Read student reviews, reach out to alumni, speak with an instructor and visit the school’s website (and the bootcamp location if you can).

To learn more about coding bootcamps and read alumni reviews, visit switchup.org.

We’d love to hear from you, even if it’s just to say hi. Email us anytime at info@switchup.org and follow us on Facebook for the latest updates.

AuthorSwitchup

Switchup matches you with the best technology education courses. Switch into the new economy.

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